Get a Kit

Having an emergency supply kit is essential to making it through a disaster safely. Make sure to have supplies on hand to last each person at least three days. We've outlined a great list for you to start with.

  Download List

Once you have the essentials you should add the following to your kit:

Infants + Toddlers
Special Needs
Older Virginians
Pets
Vehicle

I have an

infant

or

toddler

If you have a young child, it is imperative to have supplies on-hand if a disaster strikes. Creating an emergency kit in advance will prepare your family for even the most unexpected occurrence. Keeping the items below in ready supply will help to ensure that your child is comfortable and cared for.

If you have infants or toddlers, keep these items for them in your emergency supply kit:

  • Formula.
  • Bottled water to mix with formula and to wash bottles.
  • Bottles.
  • Receiving blankets.
  • Diapers – keep the diaper size current.
  • A heat source such as a folding stove (with fuel, matches and a pan) to heat water.
  • Hand warmers, ponchos, snow suit.
  • Disposable wipes.
  • Latex gloves.
  • Copy of a current shot record.
  • Bath towels and wash cloths.
  • Clothing.
  • Burp cloths, bibs.
  • Suction bulb.
  • Binkies and toys.
  • Baby lotion and sunscreen.
  • Cotton swabs.
  • Medications.
  • Diaper rash ointment.
  • Plastic baggies.
  • Dishes and cups.

I have a child with

special needs

If someone in your household, especially a child, has special needs it is important to have all of the supplies they would require in an accessible place. Keep lists of medications and contact numbers for pharmacies and doctors on hand and be sure share those lists with a friend or family member.

If a member of your household is disabled, include these special items in your emergency supply kit:

  • Hearing aid batteries, wheelchair batteries and oxygen.
  • A list of prescription medicines, including dosage, treatment and allergy information. Talk to your pharmacist or doctor about how to prepare for an emergency.
  • Include contact numbers for your pharmacy and medical supply providers if you need oxygen, dialysis supplies or diabetic supplies.
  • A list of doctors, relatives or friends to notify if you are hurt.
  • Copies of your medical insurance and Medicare cards.
  • A list of medical devices and their model and serial number. Include operating information and instructions.

Make sure that a friend or family member has a copy of these lists and contact numbers. If you have a communication disability, make sure your emergency information notes the best way to communicate with you.

I am a

older Virginian

If you or a family member is older, it is essential to keep your/their medical information and prescriptions in a convenient place. When creating an emergency kit, include copies of medications, dosages and doctor contact information, as well as copies of your media insurance.

If you or someone in your family is older, be sure to include these special items in your emergency supply kit:

  • A list of prescription medicines, including dosage, treatment and allergy information. Talk to your pharmacist or doctor about what else you need to prepare for an emergency.
  • Items to fill denture needs.
  • Hearing aid batteries, wheelchair batteries and oxygen.
  • Make a list of prescription medicines including dosage, treatment and allergy information. Talk to your pharmacist or doctor about what else you need to prepare.
  • Include contact numbers for your pharmacy and medical supply providers if you require oxygen, dialysis supplies or diabetic supplies.
  • A list of doctors, relatives or friends who should be notified if you are hurt.
  • Copies of your medical insurance and Medicare cards should be readily available.
  • A list of the style and serial number of medical devices or other life-sustaining devices. Include operating information and instructions.

Make sure that a friend or family member has a copy of these lists and contact numbers. If you have a communication disability, make sure your emergency information notes the best way to communicate with you.

I have a

pet

Pets can often be forgotten when planning for emergencies. When you’re putting together emergency kits, don’t forget about your furry friends. Be sure to have a substantial amount of food and water on hand and make a plan for where your pet can go if your family needs to evacuate.

If you need to evacuate, DO NOT leave your pets behind. Your pet’s supply kit will stay with your pet if you have to evacuate. Plan now where your pet will stay if you have to evacuate:

  • Consider a friend’s or relative’s home, a pet-friendly hotel or motel, a kennel or veterinarian’s office.
  • Talk to your vet or local humane society about an emergency plan for your pet.
  • Most emergency shelters will allow service animals only.
  • Learn more about pet safety.

Include in the kit:

  • At least three days worth of food in airtight, waterproof containers. Include a can opener, if necessary.
  • At least three days worth of water specifically for your pet.
  • Food and water bowls.
  • Extra collar with an ID tag and leash.
  • Current photos of you and your pet together, in case you get separated.
  • Crate or other pet carrier that is large enough for your pet to stand, turn around and lie down. Include blankets or towels for bedding.
  • Litter box and litter, newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags.
  • Familiar items, such as toys and treats.

In severe weather, do not leave your pets outdoors.

I am in a

vehicle

You never know where you’ll be when an emergency occurs. When you’re planning for disasters, make sure to create a supply kit for your car as well. Having the supplies below readily available will protect you from potential danger you encounter while in your vehicle.

Get a small container, such as an old backpack, small suitcase or plastic tub, and fill it with:

  • Bottles of water and non-perishable food such as protein or cereal bars.
  • A list of emergency contacts with phone numbers.
  • Flashlight and batteries.
  • Whistle.
  • Rain poncho and umbrella.
  • Mittens or gloves, socks and caps.
  • Several blankets.
  • Sack of sand or clay kitty litter for traction.
  • Snow/ice scraper and small shovel.
  • Jumper cables and instructions.
  • Bright colored cloth to use as a flag.
  • Road flares.
  • Toilet paper, paper towels and hand wipes.

Additional items you should consider adding to an emergency supply kit:

VDEM Printable Checklists Available

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My Plan

Establish meeting places, designate emergency contacts and record medical information to prepare for any emergency.

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Supply Kit

Ensure you and your family are equipped with flashlights, a first aid kit, a 3-day supply of food and more.

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Stay Informed

It is critical that you have the most local, up-to-date information from emergency officials as well as action plans for every type of emergency.

Ready VA Checklist